Must-know Hacks to Enjoy the Forbidden City

During the October holidays, teeming crowds turn up at the historical site for an exotic travel experience into the Satan’s pit. For most of the Beijing residents’ going to the Forbidden City is out of question throughout the holidays. Even all through the busiest of weeks, below are some tricks that can make visiting the Forbidden City more tolerable when not pleasant.

  1. Plan for an early morning visit: The ticket sales limit is 80,000 a day. This may seem like its a lot but during special exhibitions and holidays but the possibility of the tickets selling out by early on in the afternoon is very high.

(Advanced Tip: A reservation system is available online and you can book at most 10 tickets for a group except you need to have someone who reads Chinese – or you can do so yourself – and even have a payment method like Zhifubao or Alipay.)

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  1. Skip Mao: About 90% of the tourists approach Forbidden City via Tiananmen to the south. Getting here for an exotic travel experience often requires that you pass through rather long lines to get to the security checks. In order to avoid these, use the west or east entrance. Pay the entrance fee and walk into the park to the east side. This will get you to ticketing area right outside the Forbidden City main entrance. However, you will need to queue for the museum security checks so you can go inside.
  2. Stay away from the crowded area: Most visitors follow the same route right into the center of Forbidden City. Stay away from the crowded places and rather explore the interesting parts by turning right or left. When you walk along the wall going towards the East Gate, you will come to a fascinating and quiet museum of the palace architecture. Down the stairs near the East Gate as if going back towards the courtyard you will find the Literary Flourishing Hall which is a ceramic well-curated museum.

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  3. Keep away the mid-axis: Make a point to visit Cining Gong and Shoukang Gong which was home to the emperor’s mother in 18 century. This is a functioning archaeological site which has sculpture displays that date back to more than 1,500 years. This includes terracotta soldiers loaned from Xi’an.
  4. Use an alternative exit: Officially, Forbidden City is to be exited through one way that is north-south. However, the transport options outside the northern gate are restricted to jam-packed buses and trishaw hustlers. You can, however, exit from the Donghuamen (east gate) which lets out into the quieter street which has better taxi options and is closer to the nearby subway. Should you be hungry, a division of Siji Minfu- a famous Beijing restaurant and TRB Bites are located outside the eastern gate.

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  5. Remember to carry your passport: In 2015 new policies were enacted which require you to present a type of identification for every ticket purchased. The security personnel also look for lighters since it’s not advisable smoking inside the 600-old wooden palace.

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One more last tip – always ask a local for the best time to visit China or you can always rely on us at askus@ladyredot.com. If you have been to China, come and share your stories with us!


 

KallyKally is a former Sales and Customer Service manager turned Writer and Founder of MiddleMe.net. She came from Singapore; lived in Shanghai and now calls Kuala Lumpur her home. After hanging up her corporate briefcase, she now pursue her passions – Writing, Traveling and of course, hunting for good food.

Connect with me @ Kally@ladyredot.com

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Delicious Dim Sum in Hong Kong

While travelling to Hong Kong, don’t forget to spend some time to try the infamous dish of Dim Sum. Originated from Guang Dong, China, Dim Sum is a series of various small portion dishes presented in a bamboo steamer. Often linked with yum cha, which is the act of drinking tea, eating dim sum won’t be completed without having tea as the drinks. In Hong Kong, you can find Dim Sum everywhere from humble street foods until five-stars restaurants. Because of its exceedingly diverse variations that dim sum has, we conclude top five types of Dim Sum to help you start on your culinary journey. Be careful, once you have tried dim sum, you will never stop eating it.

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Cha Siu bao (Cantonese barbeque pork-filled bun)
Before you start the meal, you gonna break the bao, specifically the Cha Siu bao. There two types of cha siu bao: steamed and baked, steam cha siu bao has white exterior like mantau or baozi, while baked cha siu bao, its gonna has a special golden brown colour and its glaze with flavour. It is the bun that put yeast or baking powder in it, to make it fluffy. The filling itself exist diced pork tenderloin and mixed into a syrupy mixture. Eating Cha siu bao is like eating candy bacon.

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Shumai
Shumai is also referred to as “pork and mushroom dumpling” in Cantonese shumai. The other variation is when Shumai made from pork and shrimp mixture and wrap in a wonton wrapper. The filling is consisting the meat and seafood as in the menu and also added some of the chinese sauce in the mixture. In Chinese shumai, they used the Chinese black mushroom as a choice in the filling. The centre of the shumai usually garnishes with crab roe or diced carrot as a decorative presentation.

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Ha gao (Crystal shrimp dumpling)
Ha gao is a traditional Cantonese dumpling. This is very difficult dim sum to make the crystal skin. Ha gao is often served together with shumai. The skin is transparent and so smooth. Based on the skin, the dim sum chef skill will be judged based on how thin and translucent the skin is, but yet steady and not break when it picked up with the chopstick. The filling of the dumpling should be generous. The most important are it must be cooked well, to bring the juiciness of the shrimp and also avoiding the shrimps for becoming lumpy.

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Xiaolongbao (Steamed Basket Bun)
Xiaolongbao is smooth, tender, and some kind of translucent dumpling. It is different from white and fluffy steamed bun made by raised flour referred to a baozi. Traditionally xiaolongbao filled with minced pork. Another variant is used other meat, seafood, even vegetables as a filling. Inside the wrapping contain meat filling alongside its cubes gelatin-gelled aspic. The heat from the steaming process turns the solid cube gelatin-gelled aspic into a delicious soup. To eat the xiaolongbao usually dipped in black vinegar with a thin fine slice of ginger to make the taste more succulent.

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Fengzhao (Chicken feet)
Perhaps the most visually unappealing or appealing, it depends on who you are, the chicken feet. Some people said that chicken feet are a delicacy of Chinese cuisine. In Hong Kong, chicken feet typically steam to make it soft before its simmer with a special characteristic sauce contains: black fermented beans, bean paste, sugar or in abalone sauce. Sometimes the sauce added by drops of chilli oil, to make the heat and more taste of the chicken feet.

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Do you know that we organise food tour as well? To find out more, reach out to us at askus@ladyredot.com.


dsc_4705-jpg Hello, I’m Jenica from Indonesia.  As a law student in progress, studying law can sometimes become really boring.  That’s why I always like to wander around and exploring new, unusual places to relieve some tension.  I also like to capture my experience through lenses and especially from writing, because it helps me to create memories that will last forever, yet it can also enjoy by a lot of people.  Meanwhile, if I don’t have time to travel, you can find me easily at the markets while trying delicious street foods from various local food stalls.  Nasi goreng, rendang, and martabak are my all time favourite that will never be replaced with anything. For me, diet always starts tomorrow so  let’s enjoy the life to the fullest!  If you want to know more about me, drop me an email now.

Bucket Lists: Must Try Activities for Adventurous Hearts

Going on an adventure is unquestionably good for you physically, mentally and emotionally. It’s a unique way to travel and appreciate the beauty of the world. If you haven’t created your 2017 trip itinerary, considering doing it the adventurous way.

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Shark Dives
Irrespective of the type of sharks you’ll be swimming with —hammerhead sharks, reef sharks, white tip sharks or the gentle giant whale sharks—dipping in the water with even just one shark takes a lot of courage and is not for the faint-hearted.

However, the activity is as rewarding as it is risky, and is certainly a unique way to respect and appreciate marine life, specifically sharks, which usually spell menace to some people. Lucky for those who’d love to give this a try, this activity is available in a lot of places. You can do this in Mexico, Bahamas, Philippines, South Africa, Costa Rica, Maldives, Fiji, North Carolina and of course, most places in Australia.

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Adventure Caving
Not for the claustrophobic, this activity requires one to not only be physically fit but also mentally committed. With headlamps as your only source of light (99% of the time), you’ll have to squeeze your way through tight and moist places, and you have to be ready for unexpected bumps.

After gruelling hours in dark passages, caverns decorated with beautiful rocks or breathtaking waterfalls usually, will cap the trip with so much satisfaction. If you want to see the beauty of the underworld, New Zealand, Belize, Vietnam, China, Slovenia, Malaysia, Philippines, Austria, Iceland, France, Italy, Mexico, Scotland, Venezuela, USA, and South Africa are all famous for their mysterious caves.

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Hiking and Trekking
Hiking and trekking can take hours, or even days depending on your trail, so stopovers are necessary to regain your momentum. Both require a lot of stamina and preparation as you’ll not only be walking for a long time, you also have to be ready for heat or cold depending on where you are. The rewards you reap from these activities are many, from the scenic views to the quiet and still moment with nature.

If you want to hit the road less traveled, try the best trails in the world: Queen Charlotte Track (New Zealand), Bay of Fires (Australia), Chilkoot Trail (Alaska), Fitz Roy Trek (Argentina), Kungsleden (Sweden), Tonquin Valley (Canada), Croagh Patrick (Ireland), Kalalau Trail (Hawaii), and Mountain of the Moon (Uganda).

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Skydiving
While jumping out of a plane and freefalling from thousands of feet above may be something you’d never do even when it’s the only way to survive, skydiving can be very fulfilling especially to those who want to challenge their fear of heights. If your guts (and budget) allow you, try skydiving in Palm Jumeirah (Dubai), Livingstone (Zambia), and Cairns (Australia).

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Heli-ski
This is perhaps the least famous one on the list, as there are only a limited number of spots that offer this kind of adventure. Also, the ski equipment you need and the helicopter ride mean this activity does not come cheap. To heli-ski, a helicopter takes you to a remote snow mountain so you can ski or snowboard downhill. If you like to get that adrenaline rush while you slide downhill, try heli-skiing in Japan, Switzerland, British Columbia, Russia, and even India.

If you are ready for the adventure of your lifetime, we are ready for you! Allow LadyRedot plan your adventures in 2017 and create a lifelong worth of memories for you. Have a chat with us at askus@LadyRedot.com.


mish

Mish worked as a travel expert, customer service specialist and a communications trainer in the past. After working for eight years straight since she graduated, she decided to give up her corporate job. She now focuses on her 4-year old son, works as a freelance writer and a real estate assistant. She is a sun-worshipper, a water baby, and an earth warrior. And oh, she’s tiny but she is an Olympic-level glutton. Let her bring your tummy around the globe! You can reach her at LinkedIn.

Amazing Temples All Over the World

Regardless of one’s religion or beliefs, temples are fascinating structures that envelope mystery, devotion, divinity and culture. Here, in no particular order, let us bring you to top 10 amazing temples from all over the world, from different religions.

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Angkor Wat
Covering 162.6 hectares, Cambodia’s Angkor Wat is the largest religious shrine in the world, and probably the most famous, too. This magnificent structure features over 3000 asparas or heavenly nymphs carved into its walls and astounding bas-reliefs detailed with intricate carvings of mythology and historical events. The complex is surrounded by a moat and has towers that mark every corner.

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Borobudur (or Borabudur)
This Mahayana Buddhist temple is the largest Buddhist monument in the world. It was built in the 9th century and is located in Central Java, Indonesia. This gigantic temple has about 55,000m3 of stones. One can read the story of Buddha’s life and his teachings through its bas-reliefs for over 2 miles.

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The Hanging Monastery or Hanging Temple
This small temple is in Datong, China. It’s mainly made of wood and is suspended in the air with only thin timbers as support. It’s notable not only for its location (it’s built into a cliff) but it is also because it encompasses three Chinese traditional religions (Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism).

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Paro Takstang
Also called Takstang Palphug Monastery or the Tiger’s Nest, this Himalayan Buddhist temple clings to a cliff in Takstang Trail, Bhutan. Built in 1962 in devotion to Padmasambhava, this temple is only accessible by passing through mountainous paths. The monastery has eight caves, only four are easy to access. Fenced with emerald green mountains, the surroundings are as breathtaking as the temple.

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Mahabodhi Vihar Temple
Another Buddhist temple on the list, this temple in Bodh Gaya, India features a 50-meter tall grand temple and the sacred Bodhi tree, among others. It’s believed to be where Prince Siddharta attained enlightenment and became Buddha.

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The Abu Simbel Temples
The Abu Simbel Temples are two gigantic rock temples located in Nubia, Egypt built during the reign of Ramesses II. Saved by UNESCO, the complex was relocated in 1968 and now sits on a plateau. The temple’s interior shows engravings of Ramesses and his wife paying homage and making offerings to the gods and his great victory at Kadesh.

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Temple of Hephaestus
This temple is located in Athens, Greece overlooking the Agora. What makes it amazing is that after all the years, one can say it’s remarkably preserved. It has sculptures that depict the battle of Thesseus and the Lapiths against the Centaurs, the labours of Hercules, and the fall of Troy. The structure features Pentelic and Parian marble, terracotta roof, wooden ceilings and limestone steps.

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The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood
Dedicated to his father, Alexander II, Alexander III manned the construction of this church in 1883. It is located along the Griboedov Canal in St. Petersburg, Russia. It contains more than 7500 m2 of intricate mosaics depicting biblical scenes, which entirely cover the walls and ceilings of the church.

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Chichen Itza
This is actually an ancient Mayan City in Mexico that has pyramids and temples. It’s most notable for El Castillo or the Temple of Kukulkan, which exhibits the Mayan’s expertise on astronomy. It has 365 steps, one step for each day of the year. On the equinox of Spring and Autumn, a shadow in the shape of a serpent falls on the pyramid, which descends and then joins a stone serpent as the sun sets.

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Machu Picchu
This is actually a city, but it’s on the list as it has temples and palaces and was built as a ceremonial site. The Incas exhibited expertise on landscape engineering, as the buildings and terraces of the site are meticulously situated in a steep, mountainous terrain. Surrounded by tropical forests in the eastern slope of the Andes, this site is truly amazing.

History is best heard through the mouth of the locals as they bring you back in time through their stories and emotions. We can link you up with them, just askus@LadyRedot.com.


mish

Mish worked as a travel expert, customer service specialist and a communications trainer in the past. After working for eight years straight since she graduated, she decided to give up her corporate job. She now focuses on her 4-year old son, works as a freelance writer and a real estate assistant. She is a sun-worshipper, a water baby, and an earth warrior. And oh, she’s tiny but she is an Olympic-level glutton. Let her bring your tummy around the globe! You can reach her at LinkedIn.

Celebrating Chinese New Year in Taiwan

Chinese New Year, one of the most important celebrations to Chinese all around the world. Whether you are in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore even in the States, you will probably be participating in some of the festive celebrations in your community.

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Background

Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, is the first day of the Lunar Calendar but has no specific date on the Gregorian calendar. It falls anytime between late January and early February. In 2017, it falls on the 28th of January.

Aside from being the most important holiday in Taiwan, it also is the longest, being celebrated for 15 days. The official holiday, however, only lasts for a day or two dependable on different years.

Traditions

Prayers to the Ancestors
The festival is time for the Chinese people to honour their deities, so they go to temples and pray. They also offer sacrifices to their ancestors.

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Cleaning
Days before the New Year, the locals make sure to meticulously clean their homes to welcome good luck and get rid of evil spirits. The home cleaning should not be done on New Year’s Day, however, as doing so may deflect good luck and fortune.

Red
The colour red, which symbolises joy and fortune in the Chinese tradition, is widely used during the Chinese New Year. Locals decorate their houses with red posters with Chinese sayings written on them, put up red lanterns and wear red clothing.

Flowers and Oranges
In Taiwan, plum blossom and water narcissus are also used as decorations. Plum blossom symbolises courage and hope while water narcissus symbolises good luck. Oranges symbolise luck and fortune.

Loud Firecrackers
Setting off of loud firecrackers is also done, which is believed to ward off bad luck or ill fortune. The louder the firecracker, the more auspicious it gets.

Visits to Family and Friends
The Chinese New Year happens during the winter season and is the perfect time for the locals to enjoy their break and visit their family and friends. They enjoy good food with the company of each other and even go to tourist spots during this time.

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Red envelopes
Young children receive cash in red envelopes, called Ang Bao given to them by married adults. The adults, however, do not receive anything in return, as it’s not customary to give gifts to them unless the gift comes from their employer. It will be a denomination of even numbers like $2, $6, $8 and $10. The number 4 is deem unlucky by the Chinese.

Celebrations

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Bombarding Master Han Dan
This special ceremony is held in Taitung. A man is chosen to be “Master Han Dan”, the god of wealth. He wears a pair of red pants and holds a bamboo fan to shield his face. Four followers carry him on a sedan chair. The people will then throw firecrackers at him for abundance.

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Yanshui Beehive Fireworks Festival
Held on the same day as the Lantern Festival, the people visit Yanshui Wu Temple for worship. Fireworks will be set off on the ground level, rather towards the sky, like thousands of mini rockets launching towards you. It is considered lucky to be hit by one of the rockets. No doubt, it is absolutely dangerous and one must be well prepared to be suited up in a safety suit and helmet.

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Pingxi Sky Lantern Festival
Held in Pingxi of New Taipei City, the lantern festival concludes the 15-day New Year celebration. The Kongming Lanterns were originally used to pass military secret messages, but are now used for festivals and celebrations. The lanterns are handcrafted using oiled rice paper and bamboo frame. The small candle inside it is then lit, and the heat it creates lifts the lantern up the sky. Most people write their wishes on the lanterns to send them to the gods above, hoping their wishes will be granted. It is truly a sight to behold.

 

If you like to experience the true local festivals, drop us an enquiry at askus@ladyredot.com for a chat on how we can help to create unforgettable memories for you.


mish

Mish worked as a travel expert, customer service specialist and a communications trainer in the past. After working for eight years straight since she graduated, she decided to give up her corporate job. She now focuses on her 4-year old son, works as a freelance writer and a real estate assistant. She is a sun-worshipper, a water baby, and an earth warrior. And oh, she’s tiny but she is an Olympic-level glutton. Let her bring your tummy around the globe! You can reach her at LinkedIn.

 

 

Chinese New Year in China

We are approaching what is called the biggest festival among the Chinese in the world. Of course, the biggest country that will be celebrating Chinese New Year is China. Do you know that a lot of offices and factories closes for at least 7 days for this big event for the Chinese workers who hasn’t seen their family for a year to travel home for Chinese New Year. It is deem unfilial not to go home with gifts during this period hence every year, China has this human migration all over the country, flocking to go home.

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History
There are a number of versions of the history of the Chinese New Year, but the most famous revolve around the mythical beast Nian. Legend says Nian is fond of threatening and eating humans, especially young children. The people, except for one old man, decided to flee and hide from the terrifying creature. The brave man decided to stay and ward off the horrifying best by using red pieces of paper and firecrackers. The people left the old man anyway. Upon their return on the next day, they were astounded to see the town was just as they left it: nothing was destroyed. The townspeople began to conclude that the old man was actually a deity who saved them and that loud noises and the colour red fend off Nian. From that day on, the people made sure to wear red clothing and decorate with red lanterns and red spring scrolls every time the New Year comes. Nian never showed his face to the people again.

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Significance
Also known as the Spring Festival, it starts on the 23rd day of the 12th lunar month of the Chinese calendar. In 2017, it falls on January 28. It is a key public holiday for the Chinese people, and it usually lasts for about 23 days. Most shops, restaurants and business are closed for several days, but supermarkets and public transportation are available (although most of the time overcrowded). Chinese New Year is celebrated not only in Mainland China but also in Singapore, Taiwan, Macau, Hongkong, Thailand, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

Aside from honouring the Chinese deities, the festival is time to celebrate their hard work all year long and to wish their families and friends a prosperous New Year, just like the non-Chinese New Year.

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Celebration
Aside from decorating their homes with red lanterns and red posters, wearing red clothing (the color red was a sort of an amulet, but now symbolizes happiness and fortune), Chinese people make sure to thoroughly clean their homes days before the New Year’s day to rid of bad luck and to welcome good luck. Families with members from different generations gather around tables to enjoy the “reunion dinner” or the New Year’s Eve dinner. They also gift gifts, usually money inside a red envelope mostly to children and seniors. Adults do not usually receive money unless it is from an employer.

Customarily, fish and dumplings (usually in Northern China) are served for the New Year’s Eve dinner. Foods like New Year Cake, Tang Yuan, Congee, and a lot of others are served depending on personal preference.

Aside from the celebration in their homes, cultural activities are also organised. These include imperial performances, ancestor worship and the famous dragon dance. They also pray in temples for bountiful fortune and luck. Firecrackers are set off; the louder they are, the better.

It is also believed that asking for money on New Year’s and cleaning the house within the first three days are huge taboos in a traditional Chinese setting. Doing so will not attract good luck.

If you are looking to travel to China during Chinese New Year or you would like to experience first hand on Chinese New Year culture in China, we can arrange for you! Just askus@ladyredot.com and we will ensure that you will savour the full experience of local festival celebration.


mish

Mish worked as a travel expert, customer service specialist and a communications trainer in the past. After working for eight years straight since she graduated, she decided to give up her corporate job. She now focuses on her 4-year old son, works as a freelance writer and a real estate assistant. She is a sun-worshipper, a water baby, and an earth warrior. And oh, she’s tiny but she is an Olympic-level glutton. Let her bring your tummy around the globe! You can reach her at LinkedIn.

Best Nature Picture Perfect Backdrops in Asia

When it comes to photoshoots, Mother Earth have so many natural backdrops that wow us, it is impossible to just pick just 10 out of thousand fascinating sceneries. So, for this article, I only choose representatives, well-known or hidden gems, from each destination in Asia for nature-savvy folks like me. Get ready to pleasure your photogenic souls with these favourites.

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1. Panjin Red Beach, China
I know China is an amazing country and she isn’t lack of white sanded beaches. Pay a visit to the magnificent red beach, the unique red carpet colour due to the special seaweed, growing on this salty delta land. I promise you it will change your definition of beach forever. Best time to capture this wonder is during Autumn, when they started to turn red, be aware of the crowd, though.

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2. Cổ Thạch beach, Vietnam
Another unusual beach for movie-like shots is located in Tuy Phong, 90km from Phan Thiet. The well-hidden beach is covered with the most colourful small stones in various shapes. If you find stone banks and giant rocks are magnificent, this is the must-see destination for you. Tip: visit this beach in March- April for alien-like photos: when the rocks are covered with green moss, blended with crystal water, the sunset at this place is simply beyond words.

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3. Kelimutu crater lakes, Indonesia
Are you obsessed with magic and want your photo to have some magical touch without any touch ups using Photoshop? You have just come to right place! On top of a volcano, there are 3 lakes, with different colours that change with the seasons that is believed due to the residence of after-life spirits . The iconic lakes were once featured on Indonesia currency.

4. Sigiriya, Sri Lanka
There is something about the massive rocks that always catch my attention. The spectacular and well reserve cliff are truly amazing. From the way down to all the way up, there are hundreds of spots for you to take photos. If you are willing to climb to the top, you will be rewarded with the extraordinary paranormal view of Sri Lanka.

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5. Padang Pasir at Pantai Klebang, Melaka, Malaysia
What do you know about Malaysia? Yes, I’m sure we are all familiar with the stunning white-sand beaches, exotic tropical forests of the “truly Asia”. Do you know that there is a desert-like spot in this country? Actually, Padang Pasir is a white sand dune near to the beach, photos taken here can be easily mistaken for those in the real desert in Abu Dhabi.

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6. Rice terraces and hill tribes, Sapa, Vietnam
As one of the most favourite spots for honeymooners, the rice terraces make you feel peaceful in the most ordinary way. Visit this top north area, indulge yourself at the laid-back Sapa town and let the ethnic group local here leads you to their wonders. I’m sure the saying “inspiration comes from the ordinary” is absolutely true.

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7. Shibazakura, Hokkaido, Japan
Japan, I know, you know, the tiny island with splendid landscapes across the country. If you want to catch something as fascinated as sakura blooming, consider visiting Hokkaido during May and June, when the Shibazakura festival is held. The vast hill covered by pink carpet made up of the blossoming flowers, ensure you get a stunning jaw-dropping photo.

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8. Tavan Bogd Mountain, Mongolia
Experienced the nomadic lifestyle, and get your breathtaking scenes all over this perfect picture country. Allow yourself blending into the mother nature and let her inspire the artist in you. One thing I’m afraid is that you will be so overwhelmed by the beauty that you might forget to capture them!

9. Ghanche District, Gilgit–Baltistan, Pakistan
The media definitely exposes you enough with the chaos in Pakistan but failed to mention how beautiful the country has to offer. Yes, what you seeing is not in Canada or any Europe country but rather a small town in Pakistan. Plan your visit in Autumn and enjoy the beautiful yellow fallen leaves along the road, above your head, and under your feet.

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10. Palawan, The Philipines
Finally, back to the classic, turquoise water, dazzling white sand, the underground river, massive cliff, I’m taking you to the newly-claim “World Nature of Wonders”, Palawan. Ensure to get a waterproof camera here if you wish to have the underwater world as your perfect backdrop.

Set your camera right, pick the perfect season, explore the goddess settings and learn to treasure the mother Earth’s gifts. Join us for more than just reading content off our website, we can bring you to the ends of Earth for the most beautiful sights feast upon your eyes, just askus@ladyredot.com.


 

june June explores different roles to find out what is her passion. She used to be a travel consultant, a Kindergarden English teacher, an Expedia’s Lodging Partner Support agent, and the latest is being a freelancer. Eventually, she figures that her passion is to express the hospitality spirit from her heart and inspire others from her works. Being a writer for LadyRedot, where she get inspired and inspire others, and running her own bed and breakfast in her homeland. She views life as a colorful and adventurous journey, join her as she shares her passion with you! You can reach out to her @ LinkedIn.